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  • Pochéism: Seeing Unseen

    Encheng SHENG, "Pochéism: Seeing Unseen."
    los angeles CALIFORNIA

    SCI-Arc
    advisor: Eric Owen MOSS.

    Describe your project:

    Encheng SHENG: Poché includes materials such as stone and clay. Contemporary architects present this literal poché as a solid area, filling the structure with function in section and focusing on the figure-ground result to distinguish between inside and the outside. . . .

    We fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen.
    –2 Corinthians, 4:18

    Poché includes materials such as stone and clay. Contemporary architects present this literal poché as a solid area, filling the structure with function in section and focusing on the figure-ground result to distinguish between inside and the outside. However, to reveal the relationship between hidden spaces and to approach to the visible and the invisible aspects of poché, the section drawing appears as a way to differentiate between exterior and interior surfaces. Poché’s physicality forms, rather than simply serves, the solid area in architectural drawings. Taking Cluny Monastery as an example, poché is made evident for perception. The perimeter of Cluny forms the boundary of programmatic functions, creating a physical relationship of forms.

    This approach does not represent the historical monastery in today’s city. Instead, it displays conceptual poché as the “unseen” and becomes the perceptual poché of the “seen,” achieving mutual shapes of exterior and the interior. Individual objects, remaining enclosed, maintain a distance between one other in order to demonstrate as poché the outside of inside objects and the inside of the outside mass. By applying pixelated figuration to individual objects, the outer boundaries of the interior are shaped, creating layers of interiority, each with different characteristics. Through architectural excavation, then, unseen poché between spaces can be perceived.

    sP: What or who influenced this project?
    ES: Eric Owen Moss Architects; British Castles; the context of Nolli’s map of Rome; Henry Moore’s “died Much Hadham” sculpture; the perimeter of Cluny Monastery; John Soane’s house and museum in London; and Gottfried Böhm.

    sP: What were you reading/listening to/watching while developing this project?
    ES: Composition, non-composition, and Gottfried Böhm’s Pilgrimage Church.

    sP: Whose work is currently on your radar?
    ES: Johnston Marklee architects, Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular, Thom Mayne, and Rem Koolhaas/OMA.

    Additional credits and links:
    Special credit to thesis advisor Eric Owen Moss, thesis prep advisor Elena Manferdini, thesis statement advisor Benjamin J. Smith and all my friends for the support and feedback—especially my partner Kaining Liang.

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