Ads
Ads

Ads

Ads

Ads

Ads

Ads

Ads




  • Borderline Madness


    los angeles CALIFORNIA

    SCI-Arc
    critic: Elena MANFERDINI.

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.
    Meenakshi DRAVID: Wall (n)
    Latin, vallum – ‘an earthen wall or rampart set with palisades, a row or line of stakes, a wall, a rampart, fortification’

    Wall, one of the most important plane in architecture. Wall essentially suggests division, of outside and inside, of this side and that side, of our side and their side. Wall, a singularly divisive element, keeps things within by excluding them from a set. It’s the element that lends physical identity to a line, a margin, a border. Architecture of the wall inherently assumes exclusivity, a trait inherent to the element. This exclusivity is however, not as impermeable as we might believe. The same socio-political agenda that reinforces the idea of an impenetrable border has to also make allowance for crossings, to ensure ‘legal’ trade and immigration. These crossings, these points of intervention along an otherwise hostile and divisive element provide an opportunity for positive intervention that could aim at a more inclusive border.
    If carefully planned as intervention points in some of the most densely populated areas of the border, the crossing points could assuage the exclusivity of the border, reduce the infrastructural burden on the rest of the wall and provide opportunities for revenue and mutual understanding between the local communities that will be affected by the wall.
    The crossings would be an assemblage of required functions within forms that would establish an aesthetic language that would come to be recognized with safe spaces and inclusivity. This kit-of-parts approach would reinforce familiarity and ease the otherwise Kafkaesque approach of the wall. A self-similar assembly, built the same way as the modular panels of the wall.

    sP: What or who influenced this project?
    MD: The project was influenced by two strains of thought viz. the ongoing discussion about the Trump wall and Rem Koolhaus’s thesis which was based on an idea of voluntary prison, and somehow this idea of making a divisive element a place of intrigue and derive captured my imagination.

    sP: What were you reading/listening to/watching while developing this project?
    MD: I was reading a lot of news on political shifts across the world, and how we have now come to elect far-right governments after many nations have destabilized. Our common response to refugees has been to build wall to keep them out and yet we have a popular sentiment about offering everyone a safe haven. I was also reading a lot of academic literature by situationist international and their theories on society and people and culture jamming. I thought that architecture could be used to materialize these theories into a physical space where we could atleast begin a conversation about a problem that plagues millions at large. The project was largely aimed at being a provocation.

    sP: Whose work is currently on your radar?
    MD: I have been re-visiting the works of master architects and trying to re-interpret in a world of 140 characters, so its mostly widely celebrated theories that reside on the fringe of anthropology and architecture. My graphic style however, for this project has been heavily influenced by graphic designers and cartoonists, but that’s because I thought that the provocation could play out at an aesthetic level, where everyone viewing it would come to realize that the polish and the fluff are not enough to keep something as dark as ‘the wall’ at bay.

  • Leave a Comment

    Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.