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  • A Series Of Cubes


    columbus OHIO

    A Series of Cubes is part of an ongoing exploration of alternative approaches to 3D modeling. They are abstract artifacts created solely through displacement mapping techniques.

    Here, cubes eschew traditional methods of 3D modeling such as composing volumes or sculpting clay, in favor of the unpredictability of rule-based software modifiers from fields like GIS and VFX. Because they rely on a feedback loop of trial-and-error and it is difficult to predict the exact output, the generated artifacts of this process are devoid of any initial meaning or purpose. Instead, they exist as empty archaeological fragments, shells of computationally translated data awaiting cultural interpretation. In the end, the result could be read as a set of mutant primitives. Each begins life as a simple cube, which then slowly grows outward until it doubles in size. As appendages emerge, discrepancies between them become more apparent; yet, they all exhibit a shared formal vocabulary. Their ambiguity also allows for discussion of historical themes (such as symmetry, stereotomy, volume and composition) and contemporary issues (such as digital fabrication, computational iteration and 3D modeling). Therefore, A Series of Cubes follows a tension between old and new, and puts forth formal qualities that can be approached from either side.

    sP: What or who influenced this project?:
    GC: Science fiction and its attendant visual tropes play a big part in my work. Here, I was looking at a technique called “greebling,” which is the hyper-articulation of surfaces seen on spaceships in sci-fi movies and illustrations.

    sP: What were you reading/listening to/watching while developing this project?:
    GC: Reading Philip K. Dick and listening to LCD Soundsystem. Watching everything on Netflix.

    sP: Whose work is currently on your radar?:
    GC: Recently my Instagram is flooded with images from CG artists like Mike Winkelmann (known as Beeple), Theo Triantafyllidis, and Wang & Söderström.

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