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  • Stan ALLEN & Marc McQUADE, eds., Landform Building: Architecture's New Terrain.
    2011

    Green roofs, artificial mountains and geological forms; buildings you walk on or over; networks of ramps and warped surfaces; buildings that carve into the ground or landscapes lifted high into the air: all these are commonplace in architecture today. New technologies, new design techniques and a demand for enhanced environmental performance have provoked a re-thinking of architecture’s traditional relationship to the ground. The book Landform Building sets out to examine the many manifestations of landscape and ecology in contemporary architectural practice. . . .

  • Manfredo TAFURI, The Sphere and the Labyrinth.
    1987

    This major work by Manfredo Tafuri, one of today’s most important theoretical historians and critics of architecture and urbanism, presents his critique of traditional approaches to historical investigation and criticism in a penetrating analysis of the avant-gardes and discourses of architecture. Tafuri probes the lines between reality and ideology, the gap that avant-garde ideology places between its own demands and its translation into techniques, the ways in which the avant-garde reaches compromises with the world, and the conditions that permit its existence. . . .

  • Harold BLOOM, The Anatomy of Influence.
    2012

    “Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it,” writes Harold Bloom in The Anatomy of Influence, “is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate.” For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. . . .

  • Antoine PICON, ed., Ornament: The Politics of Architecture and Subjectivity.
    2013

    Though inextricably linked with digital tools and culture, Antoine Picon argues that some significant traits in ornament persist from earlier Western architectural traditions. These he defines as the “subjective”—the human interaction that ornament requires in both its production and its reception—and the political. . . . By bringing previous traditions in ornament under scrutiny, Picon makes us question the political issues at stake in today’s ornamental revival. . . .

  • HENSEL, MENGES, & HIGHT, eds., Space Reader.
    2009

    The “Space Reader” provides a highly pertinent and contemporary understanding of space for a new generation of students and architects. It espouses a definition of space that is heterogeneous (an object or system consisting of a diverse range of different items). . . . With the onset of globalisation and the Web, heterogeneneous space, with its emphasis on differentiation, is more relevant to the contemporary condition, which encourages the mixing of space, than a much more static conception of Modernist space.

  • Mario CARPO, ed., The Digital Turn in Architecture.
    2012

    Now almost 20 years old, the digital turn in architecture has already gone through several stages and phases. Architectural Design (AD) has captured them all—from folding to cyberspace, nonlinearity and hypersurfaces, from versioning to scripting, emergence, information modelling and parametricism. . . . This anthology of AD’s most salient articles is chronologically and thematically arranged to provide a complete historical timeline of the recent rise to pre-eminence of computer-based design and production. . . .

  • Bernard TSCHUMI, Architecture Concepts: Red is Not a Color.
    2012

    An autobiographical look at the work of a seminal modernist architect. This is the first comprehensive treatment of the architecture of Bernard Tschumi. Part monograph, part architectural theory, and part story, the book narrates a three-decade journey through a personal history of architecture and architectural ideas, intertwining theory, practice, and hypothetical projects with forty built works. From Tschumi’s many written works, such as Architecture and Disjunction and The Manhattan Transcripts to such renowned projects as the Parc de la Villette in Paris. . . .

  • Robin EVANS, The Projective Cast: Architecture and Its Three Geometries.
    2000

    Anyone reviewing the history of architectural theory, Robin Evans observes, would have to conclude that architects do not produce geometry, but rather consume it. In this long-awaited book, completed shortly before its author’s death, Evans recasts the idea of the relationship between geometry and architecture, drawing on mathematics, engineering, art history, and aesthetics to uncover processes in the imagining and realizing of architectural form. . . .

  • Robin EVANS, Translations from Drawing to Building.
    1997

    Translations from Drawing to Building and Other Essays together eight of Evans’s most significant essays. Written over a period of twenty years, from 1970, when he graduated from the Architectural Association, to 1990, they represent the diverse interests of an agile and skeptical mind. The book includes an introduction by Mohsen Mostafavi, a chronological account of the development of Evans’s writing by Robin Middleton, and a bibliography by Richard Difford.

  • K. Michael HAYS, ed., Oppositions Reader.
    1998

    In its 11-year history, Oppositions, the journal of the New York-based Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (IAUS), set the agenda, introduced key players and published seminal pieces on the theorization of architecture in the late 20th century. This text collects essays from 26 issues of Oppositions. Contributions from architects, theorists and historians such as Aldo Rossi, Alan Colquhom, Leon Krier, and Denise Scott Brown, amongst others, are included.