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  • Kevin Freitas CONLIN, "VUG Museum and Artist Residency." Exterior rendering.
    troy NEW YORK

    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    critic: Adam DAYEM

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Kevin Freitas CONLIN: The VUG Museum & Residency for the Storm King Arts Center in NY State takes its name from the veins of gemstones that form in rough openings in stone, the rougher cousin of geodes.

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  • Fig. 1: Robin Evans, Projection and its Analogues: The Arrested Image.
    troy NEW YORK

    “Architects typically produce drawings and other artifacts—words, inscriptions, models, full-scale mock-ups, and so on—that allow buildings to be realized by others, at a distance from their authors. This has not always been the case. Gothic building, for example, was a constructive practice of geometric rules and traditions where master craftsmen operated to some extent as architect and builder simultaneously. In this situation, drawings were not the primary mediator between design and construction; discussions regarding the final form of a building continued throughout the construction process. . . .”

    *Fig. 1: Robin Evans, “Projection and its analogues: The Arrested Image,” 1995.

    [EXCERPTED FROM FRESH PUNCHES ]

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  • New Atlantis (a city for voluntary exiles)
    brooklyn NEW YORK

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Adam DAYEM: The year is 2100 and what was once called the nation of Kiribati is gone, its chains of low-lying islands have been completely submerged by the Pacific Ocean. Many I-Kiribati and their descendants have dispersed to Australia where they work in the health care industry or to New Zealand where they work as maritime shipping specialists. In these host nations, the I-Kiribati have become diffused. As a result, their culture and language has nearly died.

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  • Moon Monster, an architectural folly
    brooklyn NEW YORK

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    adam DAYEM: The term folly is considered to have been derived from two different French words: folie, meaning pleasure or delight; and feuilée, which quite literally refers to a leafy arbor. A folie is associated with miscalculation, foolishness and extravagance; it often serves no apparent purpose beyond some mythic or folkloric association. A feuilée, on the other hand, has nothing to do with spectacle and ostentation, but is about embracing nature in a more modest way.

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