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  • K. Michael HAYS, ed., Oppositions Reader.
    1998

    In its 11-year history, Oppositions, the journal of the New York-based Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (IAUS), set the agenda, introduced key players and published seminal pieces on the theorization of architecture in the late 20th century. This text collects essays from 26 issues of Oppositions. Contributions from architects, theorists and historians such as Aldo Rossi, Alan Colquhom, Leon Krier, and Denise Scott Brown, amongst others, are included.

  • Daniel LIBESKIND, Micromegas, in Daniel Libeskind: Countersign.
    1992

    Daniel Libeskind: Countersign collects the architect’s early work, including seminal projects like Micromegas and Chamber Works, Three Lessons in Architecture, Berlin “City Edge,” and the Jewish Museum Berlin.

  • Philip JOHNSON & Mark WIGLEY, eds., Deconstructivist Architecture.
    1988

    Catalogue accompaniment to the 1988 MoMA exhibition of the same name, Deconstructivist Architecture presents a radical architecture, exemplified by the recent work of seven architects: Frank O. Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, Rem Koolhaas, Peter Eisenman, Zaha M. Hadid, Bernard Tschumi, and Coop Himmelblau.

  • Mark WIGLEY, The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida's Haunt.
    1992

    Nowhere, Mark Wigley asserts, are the stakes higher for deconstruction than in architecture—architecture is the Achilles’ heel of deconstructive discourse, the point of vulnerability upon which all of its arguments depend. In this book Wigley redefines the question of deconstruction and architecture. By locating the architecture already hidden within deconstructive discourse, he opens up more radical possibilities for both architecture and deconstruction, offering a way of rethinking the institution of architecture while using architecture to rethink deconstructive discourse. . . .

  • Alejandro ZAERA-POLO, The Sniper's Log.
    2012

    This compilation of texts written since 1986 reveals a parallel activity to Alejandro Zaera-Polo’s professional life. The book is like a sniper’s log, a register of events for the purpose of accumulating experience for future missions, be it academic or professional, trying to identify tendencies and to assess performances, rather than to establish truth. Written for different media and formats (professional magazines, speaking engagements, and academic presentations), the texts are thread together as part of a biographical experience that reveals that theory is here primarily instrumental and seeks efficiency rather than truth. . . .

  • Mark Foster GAGE, Aesthetic Theory: Essential Texts for Architecture and Design.
    2011

    With an introduction and critical headnotes explaining the importance of each text, Mark Foster Gage offers a framework for a provocative history of ideas about beauty as they relate to contemporary thinking on architecture and design. In a world increasingly defined by sumptuous visuality, the concepts of beauty and visual sensation are not mere intellectual exercises but standards that define the very nature of design practice across disciplines and that are essential to the emerging worlds of design and architecture in the twenty-first century.

  • Mario CARPO, The Alphabet and the Algorithm.
    2011

    Digital technologies have changed architecture—the way it is taught, practiced, managed, and regulated. But if the digital has created a “paradigm shift” for architecture, which paradigm is shifting? In The Alphabet and the Algorithm, Mario Carpo points to one key practice of modernity: the making of identical copies. Carpo highlights two examples of identicality crucial to the shaping of architectural modernity: in the fifteenth century, Leon Battista Alberti’s invention of architectural design, according to which a building is an identical copy of the architect’s design; and, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the mass production of identical copies from mechanical master models, matrixes, imprints, or molds.

  • Reyner BANHAM, Theory and Design in the First Machine Age.
    1960

    First published in 1960, Theory and Design in the First Machine Age has become required reading in numerous courses on the history of modern architecture and is widely regarded as one of the definitive books on the modern movement. It has influenced a generation of students and critics interested in the formation of attitudes, themes, and forms which were characteristic of artists and architects working primarily in Europe between 1900 and 1930 under the compulsion of new technological developments in the first machine age.

  • Greg LYNN & Mark Foster GAGE, eds., Composites, Surfaces, and Software: High Performance Architecture.
    2011

    How computer technologies and digital fabrication techniques give architects unprecedented tools for crafting performance and aesthetics through cross-disciplinary collaboration. . . . Boat, airplane, and automobile design tools and software are now applied to architectural projects using robotics and high-strength, low-weight, carbon fiber composites. Greg Lynn’s studio and Mark Foster Gage’s seminar at Yale with participants Frank Gehry, Lise Ann Couture, Chris Bangle, and Greg Foley, among others generated a lively dialogue invigorating the future of design.

  • Greg LYNN & Mark RAPPOLT, eds., Greg Lynn Form.
    2008

    One of the most provocative and exciting architects today, Greg Lynn has defined how designers and architects use computers as a medium, operating in an expanded field that fuses cutting-edge technology, contemporary art, and science fiction aesthetics with architectural form. At the epicenter of a debate about the role of digital design in architecture and design, his projects skillfully blend high technology and detailed craftsmanship, driven by modeling software from the film and aerospace industries. Included are contributions from theorists, architects, and artists, and futurists such as J. G. Ballard and Bruce Sterling.