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  • POP-OP
    college station TEXAS

    This project was inspired by Op Art, a twentieth century art movement and style in which artists sought to create an impression of movement on an image surface by means of an optical illusion. Passive elements consisting of composite laminates were produced with the goal of creating lightweight, semi-rigid, and nearly transparent pieces. The incorporation of active materials comprised a unique aspect of this project: the investigation of surface movement through controlled and repeatable deformation of the composite structure using SMA wiring technology. The integration of composite materials with SMA wiring and Arduino.

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  • Bi-Polar
    college station TEXAS

    Texas A&M University
    critic: gabriel ESQUIVEL

    Team: Matt MILLER, Dale FENTON, Emau VEGA, Aubrie DAMRON, Adrian CORTEZ
    Photos: Emau VEGA

    Texas A&M University FabLab, Gabriel ESQUIVEL: The project began as a performative wall system that reacted differently to exterior and interior spaces. We realized we had to confront the fact we had two different surface logics, so rather than trying to blend these conditions, we decided to emphasize the difference indicating two current design directions. This resulted in two polar opposite geometries with opposite personalities that strongly defined exteriority and interiority.

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  • Black Narcissus
    bryan TEXAS

    The installation discusses issues of intimacy and self-contemplation, combining different sensations in a “blue mood” by combining two different sensibilities.

    ‘Black Narcissus’ highlights the importance of encompassing all methods of fabrication; digital and analog in terms of technology, management efficiency and time towards the production the project. The piece is constituted of 1,000 pieces including the 644 pieces of CNC routed syntra, 50 large flowers with jewel like crowns and 100 small flowers. The idea was to produce a structure that combines a parametrically designed large form ornamented and gardened with nonparametric flowers. Through this gardening process of aggregation, the flowers produce a sensation of excess in a garden of delight.

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  • Bi-Polar
    college station TEXAS

    Team:Matt MILLER, Dale FENTON, Emau VEGA, Aubrie DAMRON, Adrian CORTEZ
    Photos: Emau VEGA

    Texas A&M University FabLab, Gabriel ESQUIVEL: The project began as a performative wall system that reacted differently to exterior and interior spaces. We realized we had to confront the fact we had two different surface logics, so rather than trying to blend these conditions, we decided to emphasize the difference indicating two current design directions. This resulted in two polar opposite geometries with opposite personalities that strongly defined exteriority and interiority. Bi-Polar can then be explained more effectively in three systems working together: (1) The tessellated parametric logic performative exterior, (2) the loose free-flowing sensual interior, and (3) the in-between performative bladder system that mediates between the two extremes.
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  • diaphanus
    state of MEXICO

    suckerPUNCH: describe your project.

    gabriel ESQUIVEL + david HERNANDEZ M.: Diaphanus (Transparent in Latin) is an ephemeral floating bouquet like surface. It has three components; a structure, a tessellated surface, and a top layer of three-dimensional pieces organized through aggregation. A series of investigations were established not only about digital fabrication techniques, sensation, but also on the technologies of rainwater collection in order to develop a prototype that discusses performance and sensation.

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  • bunny
    college station TEXAS

    Texas A&M University. College of Architecture. Digital Surface and Geometry
    Workshop

    Digital Program Design Consultant: qing XING

    Students: ronny ECKELS, lauren WIATREK, brent GOHMERT, tim DURBIN, catlan
    FEARON, kristy LEE

    suckerPUNCH: describe your project:

    gabriel ESQUIVEL : The “Bunny” is part of a series of projects that investigate geometry from developable surfaces to weaving methods in architecture. In an effort to investigate surface logics consisting of highly porous, irregularly defined weaving systems a series of investigative strategies were employed.
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  • spulenkorb
    college station TEXAS

    Team Members:
    ryan COLLIER
    michael TOMASO
    gabriel ESQUIVEL
    The project was awarded an honorable mention in the REPEAT competition organized by TEXFAB November 2010. 

    gabriel ESQUIVEL: There is a vast precedent in fabrication projects that deal with the idea of weaving, however within those projects there are more specific techniques. This project concerns itself specifically in the spiral or coil. In “Tooling” Aranda/Lasch describe this technique as, “the spiral (which) is not so much the shape as the evidence of a shape in formation.”(1) This idea implies constant movement as a desired effect – something architecture has historically aspired to.

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  • emergent porosity
    college station TEXAS

    Texas A&M University. College of Architecture. 1st Year Graduate Studio.

    Critic: gabriel ESQUIVEL

    kuangyi TAO: The House of the Future is a project reacting to the problems emerging during modern times: overpopulation, resource shortage and virtual world development.

    Inspired by images of “body cells” depicted in the Matrix, I designed houses based on a similar system of energy and information exchange. The major difference is that people will be in control.

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  • la riviera. bistro bakery.
    bryan TEXAS

    suckerPUNCH: describe your project.

    gabriel ESQUIVEL: The premise was to renovate the entry space of the restaurant; the scope included a new bar space, wall ornament and a ceiling installation. Due to an extremely tight budget, the team developed innovative processes to reduce costs while achieving the desired atmosphere.

    photo by marcel ERMINY

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  • imaxxx
    college station TEXAS

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    adrian CORTEZ + alex HOLTZER: This design of an Alessi showroom and gallery in Houston is an argument of sensibility and surface, and is a modern interpretation of rustication. Individual modules emphasize a performative skin, and surface animation is achieved through deformation, dematerialization, and aperture. The project’s unique interior argues affect and sensation through its direct relationship with the skin.

    critic: gabriel ESQUIVEL

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