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  • Alex TAHINOS, "Cathedral of Artemis." Exterior rendering.
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania, PennDesign
    critic: Michael LOVERICH.

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Alex TAHINOS: This project adopts the narrative of a temple dedicated to Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, in Crete, Greece. This temple was set in a cave on the side of a mountain on the island.

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  • Kayleen KULESZA, "The Grotto: Urban Multi-Family Housing." Corner rendering.
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania, PennDesign
    critic: Matias del CAMPO.

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Kayleen KULESZA: The project asked the student to design an apartment building in combination with a Kaffeehaus and nightclub. . . .

    [MORE]

  • Brett Dong Ha LEE, "Shifting Hybrids: Transformations for a New Hotel and Residential Building in TriBeCa, NYC."
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania, PennDesign
    critic: Hina JAMELLE.

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Brett Dong Ha LEE: A hybrid condition building as a continuously grafting and shifting system, this project delves into how such systemic thinking is transferred into generative rules for lighting, furnishing, façade treatment, circulatory and programmatic organizations, and changing topology of units.

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  • Michael ROYER, "Colonizing Rococo." Facade, detail.
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania, PennDesign
    critic: Matias del CAMPO.

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Michael ROYER: The idea behind this project was to develop a contemporary reading of curve as it was used in Rococo Architecture. Techniques such as aggregation and emergence were used to try to revisit these architectural problems.

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  • Granular Spa Haus
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania School of Design
    critic: Matias DEL CAMPO

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Michael ISKANDAR: This project continues to investigate the architectural conditions of symmetries and repetitions, in what became my own personal fixation on how the future can accept a more contemporary means of gothic architecture. Taking the affect and geometric principles of traditional gothic vault patterns, the project manifests itself in how external facade systems can convey an internal organizational logic that is both culturally functional and beautifully new.

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  • Intersecting Boundaries
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    University of Pennsylvania, PennDesign
    critic: Matias del CAMPO

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Sarah J. BLITZER: Intersecting Boundaries is an exploration of the deformations that result from the intersection of a random and a gridded system. I began with the idea of intersecting particles using two systems: regular/gridded and irregular. My aim was to explore how these two intersecting systems can be used to create space. These intersections are the basis of the form.

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  • Dirt
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    Dirt—edited by Megan Born, MArch/MLA’08, Lily Jencks, MArch/MLA’09, and Assistant Professor of Architecture Helene Furján with Phillip M. Crosby, PhD Fellow—presents a selection of works that share dirty attitudes: essays, interviews, excavations, and projects that view dirt not as filth but as a medium, a metaphor, a material, a process, a design tool, a narrative, a system. Rooted in the landscape architect’s perspective, Dirt views dirt not as repulsive but endlessly giving, fertile, adaptive, and able to accommodate difference while maintaining cohesion. This dirty perspective sheds light on social connections, working processes, imaginative ideas, physical substrates, and urban networks.

    [BUY]

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  • 499.summit
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    greg KNOBLOCH & andreas TJELDFLAAT: Our prison system has failed to see advancements throughout the past century and desperately requires innovation and re-imagination. While recent literature begins to question the sociological status of prisons, there has be little exploration of the physical apparatus in which inmates are housed. We as designers must take a critical look at these static institutions, and question how we can play a significant role in the design and function of future prisons.

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  • karen M'CLOSKEY wins Rome Prize
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    Karen M’Closkey, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at UPENN and principal of PEG, has won the Garden Club of America Rome Prize. She has proposed A Field Guide to Rome: Baedeker and Beyond as her topic.

    PEG office of landscape + architecture is an award-winning design and research office based in Philadelphia, PA. We engage a wide range of projects in terms of content, scale, and medium. Whether through competitions, writing or client-sponsored work, we explore the overlapping terrain between the disciplines of architecture and landscape architecture. Utilizing the techniques or conventions inherent in one discipline enables us to scrutinize the conventions of the other in order to imagine new formal and material arrangements. This does not, however, lead to the uniform application of technique. If we believed in manifestos, ours would be that scale matters.

  • simon KIM & the DUFALA brothers
    philadelphia PENNSYLVANIA

    Imagine an alternative use for vacant lots and scrap yards. ICA Assistant Curator Kate Kraczon moderates a conversation between Simon Kim, PennDesign Assistant Professor of Architecture, and artists Billy and Steven Dufala about their respective reclamation projects, Philadelphia Masque and RAIR (Recycled Artist-in-Residency).

    simon KIM & the DUFALA brothers
    Thursday, 04/26
    6.30 pm / Institute of Contemporary Art
    University of Pennsylvania
    118 S. 36th Street
    Philadelphia, PENNSYLVANIA 19104