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  • Levi BRYANT.
    college station TEXAS

    This lecture is of critical importance given the fact that this is the first time Levi Bryant, one of today’s most important philosophers, will address the topic of Architecture.

    lecture: Levi BRYANT, “Machine-Oriented Architecture: Oikos and Ecology.”
    Monday, 03/09
    5.45 p.m. / Geren Auditorium
    Texas A&M University
    College Station, Texas 77843

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  • Alain de BOTTON. Photo: Charlotte de BOTTON.

    new york NEW YORK

    We often hear that art is important, but we’re seldom told exactly why. Renowned Swiss-born popular philosopher and essayist Alain de Botton believes art has relevance in answering some of our most intimate and ordinary dilemmas: Why is my work not satisfying? Why do other people seem to have a more glamorous life? How can I improve my relationships?

    lecture: Alain de BOTTON, “Art as Therapy.”
    Friday, 10/18
    6.30–8.00 p.m. / The Great Hall, Foundation Building
    The Cooper Union
    7 East 7th Street
    New York, NY 10003

    *photo: Charlotte de BOTTON.

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  • Graham HARMAN.
    los angeles CALIFORNIA

    Graham Harman’s lecture develops the central themes of object-oriented philosophy, with special attention to their implications for architecture.

    Objects come in two varieties: the real and the sensual, both of them in permanent tension with their own qualities and with each other. . . .

    lecture: Graham HARMAN, “Strange Objects Contra Parametricism.”
    Wednesday, 09/18
    7.00 p.m. / W.M. Keck Lecture Hall
    SCI-Arc Campus
    960 East 3rd Street
    Los Angeles, California 90013

    [LIVE STREAM]

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  • Ben WOODARD, Slime Dynamics.
    2012

    Despite humanity’s gradual ascent from clustered pools of it, slime is more often than not relegated to a mere residue—the trail of a verminous life form, the trace of decomposition, or an entertaining synthetic material—thereby leaving its generative and mutative associations with life neatly removed from the human sphere of thought and existence.

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  • Alain BADIOU, Cinema.
    2013

    For Alain Badiou, films think, and it is the task of the philosopher to transcribe that thinking. What is the subject to which the film gives expressive form? This is the question that lies at the heart of Badiou’s account of cinema. He contends that cinema is an art form that bears witness to the Other and renders human presence visible, thus testifying to the universal value of human existence and human freedom. . . .

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  • Jacques RANCIÈRE, Aisthesis.
    2013

    Composed in a series of scenes, Aisthesis—Rancière’s definitive statement on the aesthetic—takes its reader from Dresden in 1764 to New York in 1941. Along the way, we view the Belvedere Torso with Winckelmann, accompany Hegel to the museum and Mallarmé to the Folies-Bergère, attend a lecture by Emerson, visit exhibitions in Paris and New York, factories in Berlin, and film sets in Moscow and Hollywood.

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  • Graham HARMAN, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy.
    2012

    As Hölderlin was to Martin Heidegger and Mallarmé to Jacques Derrida, so is H.P. Lovecraft to the Speculative Realist philosophers. Lovecraft was one of the brightest stars of the horror and science fiction magazines, but died in poverty and relative obscurity in the 1930s. . . . The impact of Lovecraft on philosophy has been building for more than a decade.

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  • Ian BOGOST, Alien Phenomenology, or What It’s Like to Be a Thing.
    2012

    Humanity has sat at the center of philosophical thinking for too long. The recent advent of environmental philosophy and posthuman studies has widened our scope of inquiry to include ecosystems, animals, & artificial intelligence. Yet the vast majority of the stuff in our universe . . . remains beyond serious philosophical concern. In Alien Phenomenology, Ian Bogost develops an object-oriented ontology that puts things at the center of being. . . .

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  • Catlan FEARON, Centers for Musement: Designing Sacred Spaces for Post-Enlightenment Religious Philosophy.
    college station TEXAS

    Texas A&M University
    critic: Gabriel ESQUIVEL

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Catlan FEARON: With the post-Enlightenment destruction of the certainty of the metaphysical presence of God, the subject of religious architecture changes drastically. Just as the subject changed from God to the collective worship with the renaissance, the subject now becomes the single man and his subjective relation to the eternal, and, consequentially, to the architecture of religious typology itself.

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  • Ray BRASSIER, Suhail MALIK, & Reza NEGARESTANI.
    new york NEW YORK

    Miguel Abreu Gallery features an evening of Promethean conversation on freedom and enlightenment, welcoming three thinkers committed to exploring new trajectories within philosophical realism. Ray Brassier, Suhail Malik, and Reza Negarestani will discuss the stakes of a return to reason in the realms of philosophy, politics and art.

    in conversation: Ray BRASSIER, Suhail MALIK, & Reza NEGARESTANI, “Blow Your Mind: On Freedom and Enlightenment.”
    Saturday, 07/20
    7.00 p.m. / Miguel Abreu Gallery
    88 Eldridge Street, 4th Floor
    New York, NY 10002