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  • still life

    still life
    dusseldorf GERMANY

    rosecrans BALDWIN: take us a few steps into your process—i assume producing these images requires an extraordinarily controlled environment?

    martin KLIMAS: yes, the shooting environment must be controlled and kept consistent. the lighting is clear and direct, head on. my background is neutral, but bright enough so that the shattering object completely stands out. i drop the figurine from the same height in complete darkness while the lens of the camera is open. when the figurine hits the ground, the sound triggers the lights to go off for a fraction of a second. i do this procedure many times or until i find the one frame that is just right. i keep just one such picture for every figurine. every attempt yields a unique outcome, so i need to look for the one that best expresses a transformation of the figurine into a new form.

    rB: the degree of stillness in your pictures is remarkable, to the point of it being the first thing i notice, followed by the recognition that these objects are being blown apart. are you trying to convey something at rest or something in motion?

    mK: in my pictures you see the world through the eye of a high-speed camera. this way of seeing provides for us something that we normally cannot see, this moment of transformation can really only be imagined by us. i provide a way for us to see this action differently. it is an in-between state. a state where rest and motion can exist together. i hope this situation can be applied and give us thought in our everyday world.

    via themorningnews.org

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