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  • Architecture Itself

    Tong ZHAO and Yangluxi LI, "Folded."
    syracuse NEW YORK

    Flavored Atria and Architectural Convictions
    critic: Jennifer BONNER.

    Flavored Atria and Architectural Convictions was a four-day design workshop that brought together an interest in seriality, the atrium typology, and taste.

    Workshop #2: Flavored Atria and Architectural Convictions
    critic: Jennifer BONNER.

    Dave Hickey discusses differences between taste and desire in Pirates and Farmers: Essays on Taste:
    Warhol began with his soup-can paintings and his “Flavored Marilyns”—trademark desires produced in individual flavors to suit your taste . . . But we all have personal kinks, so Andy painted fifty-two Campbell soup-can paintings, each slightly different in its configuration and one painting for every flavor of soup: Cheese, Mushroom, Tomato, Clam Chowder, Bean and Bacon, etc. He painted about a dozen Flavored Marilyns—or Lifesaver Marilyns, as they were called at the Factory, since the candy provided the colors. All the Marilyns are identical in these paintings, but the backgrounds come in lime, orange, lemon, strawberry, pineapple, and licorice, to suit your taste while fulfilling your desires.

    In several exercises aimed at borrowing representational techniques from Andy Warhol’s Flavored Marilyns and soup-can paintings, each participant in the workshop was asked to stake out an architectural conviction in regards to the atrium typology. By working on the problem of seriality in architecture, this atria project is extremely formal, bright, and optimistic.

    Student work by:
    Folded, Tong ZHAO & Yangluxi LI.
    False Symmetries, Colin HOOVER & Nick LoCICERO.
    Half & Half, Fengqi LI & Zhe WANG.
    Layered Intrusions, Sai VEMULAPALLI & Toni JONES.
    Untouched One-Fourth, Yang SONG & Yuchi HUO.

    //

    Architecture Itself: Four Workshops on Architectural Problems
    organized by: Kyle MILLER.

    Architecture Itself is an occasion to draw out and highlight core issues within the discipline of architecture. Conceived of as a series of intensive design workshops, this course will problematize [the] fundamental elements of architecture – not doors, windows, walls, balconies and toilets, but form, space, and order. In scrutinizing architecture’s interrelationships, the output of these design workshops will make explicit links between formal composition (part-to-whole), spatial relationships (typology), aesthetic qualities (affects and effects), tectonics (assembly and detail), and, ultimately, the continuity of architectural discourse across generations (precedent).

    Rather than widen the gap between competing identities of architecture—autonomous versus contingent, or self-sufficient versus reliant—these workshops will seek to answer two questions: “What is architecture?” and “What can architecture do?” And rather than searching for justification for architecture by defining its relationship to politics, economics, social good, etc. these events will elucidate how architecture performs within its own critical context, operating on itself to strengthen its disciplinary legibility and define its cultural efficacy. In doing so, this series is comfortable with bracketing out extra-disciplinary territories and identifying architecture itself as the primary problem of architecture.

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