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  • Joe DAY, Corrections and Collections.
    2013

    America holds more than two million inmates in its prisons and jails, and hosts more than two million daily visits to museums, figures which represent a ten-fold increase in the last twenty-five years. Corrections and Collections explores and connects these two massive expansions in our built environment.

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  • Timothy HYDE, Constitutional Modernism.
    new york NEW YORK

    How does architecture make its appearance in civil society? How did architectural modernism function as a political and social instrument? Constitutional Modernism pursues these questions by exploring architecture, planning, and law as cultural forces in mid-century Cuba. Author Timothy Hyde’s analysis of the complex entanglements between these disciplines reconstructs how architects joined with other professionals and intellectuals in efforts to establish a stable civil society, from the promulgation of a new Cuban Constitution . . . until the Cuban Revolution. Join Hyde in conversation with architect and theorist Jorge Otero-Pailos.

    in conversation: Timothy HYDE & Jorge OTERO-PAILOS
    Thursday, 09/05
    7.00 p.m. / Van Alen Books
    30 W 22nd St.
    New York, NY 10010

  • Jacques RANCIÈRE, Aisthesis.
    2013

    Composed in a series of scenes, Aisthesis—Rancière’s definitive statement on the aesthetic—takes its reader from Dresden in 1764 to New York in 1941. Along the way, we view the Belvedere Torso with Winckelmann, accompany Hegel to the museum and Mallarmé to the Folies-Bergère, attend a lecture by Emerson, visit exhibitions in Paris and New York, factories in Berlin, and film sets in Moscow and Hollywood.

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  • Graham HARMAN, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy.
    2012

    As Hölderlin was to Martin Heidegger and Mallarmé to Jacques Derrida, so is H.P. Lovecraft to the Speculative Realist philosophers. Lovecraft was one of the brightest stars of the horror and science fiction magazines, but died in poverty and relative obscurity in the 1930s. . . . The impact of Lovecraft on philosophy has been building for more than a decade.

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  • Ian BOGOST, Alien Phenomenology, or What It’s Like to Be a Thing.
    2012

    Humanity has sat at the center of philosophical thinking for too long. The recent advent of environmental philosophy and posthuman studies has widened our scope of inquiry to include ecosystems, animals, & artificial intelligence. Yet the vast majority of the stuff in our universe . . . remains beyond serious philosophical concern. In Alien Phenomenology, Ian Bogost develops an object-oriented ontology that puts things at the center of being. . . .

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  • essential architecture books
    25 bc – ongoing

    suckerPUNCH updates its list of essential books, manifestos, journals, catalogs, and monographs that inform and investigate the work found in the suckerPUNCH collection. Still listed in descending chronological order, with new additions from: Pier Vittorio AURELI; Harold BLOOM; Mario CARPO; Peter COOK; Greg LYNN & Mark GAGE; Antoine PICON; Bernard TSCHUMI; Mark WIGLEY; Alejandro ZAERA-POLO; and many more.

    [CLICK HERE FOR LIST]

  • Yoon HER, The Death of Authorship.
    los angeles CALIFORNIA

    USC
    critic: Alvin HUANG

    suckerPUNCH: Describe your project.

    Yoon HER: The book once stored all the knowledge, or authorship. However, in the 21st century, we no longer need tangible material—that is, the paperback book—to hold authorship. People are sharing ideas without noticing that he/she is violating one’s asset on their screen. Libraries were once the storage of authorship since books were incarnations of author’s original work. However, books no longer secure one’s authorship, and we need to think about how to preserve the idea of one’s originality.

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  • Alejandro ZAERA-POLO, The Sniper's Log.
    2012

    This compilation of texts written since 1986 reveals a parallel activity to Alejandro Zaera-Polo’s professional life. The book is like a sniper’s log, a register of events for the purpose of accumulating experience for future missions, be it academic or professional, trying to identify tendencies and to assess performances, rather than to establish truth. Written for different media and formats (professional magazines, speaking engagements, and academic presentations), the texts are thread together as part of a biographical experience that reveals that theory is here primarily instrumental and seeks efficiency rather than truth. . . .

  • Mark Foster GAGE, Aesthetic Theory: Essential Texts for Architecture and Design.
    2011

    With an introduction and critical headnotes explaining the importance of each text, Mark Foster Gage offers a framework for a provocative history of ideas about beauty as they relate to contemporary thinking on architecture and design. In a world increasingly defined by sumptuous visuality, the concepts of beauty and visual sensation are not mere intellectual exercises but standards that define the very nature of design practice across disciplines and that are essential to the emerging worlds of design and architecture in the twenty-first century.

  • A New Sculpturalism
    los angeles CALIFORNIA

    A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California examines contemporary Southern California architecture from 1987 to the present, exploring its experimental nature, sculptural tendency, and exciting evolution. Contributions by leading architectural historians coupled with a stunning collection of images present recent works in terms of sculpturalism and urbanism, and consider the impact of the history and environment of Los Angeles, as well as the creative and working processes.